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Home > Letters to CR

Ron Every On Siegel and Shuster and Superman
posted August 20, 2009
 

It appears that whoever wrote that piece has no sense of history beyond the last fourteen days, if that.

Not that it is going to happen, but I for one would be THRILLED to see two competing Supermen, one at DC, and the other at a startup indy company, maybe called "Siegel/Shuster Comics."

More likely, the bean counters at Warner will hammer out a deal, and send over Royalty checks every week to the respective families and tell them to keep their nose out of their business or they'll wind up buried in the same Kinney Corp parking lot as Jimmy Hoffa smile (just kidding about that last part).

If somebody thinks that people at DC Comics are doing a great job, they have another think coming anyway. What's a good selling comic book's circulation these days? Ten, twenty thousand? Thirty thousand a mega-hit? Back in my day, young whippersnappers, funny books sold in the millions. As recently as the early 1970s, Marvel and DC were dropping comic books that "only" sold less than 200,000 copies a month.

I've pretty much given up on Super-Heroes these days, although I did subscribe at Big Planet to the 12-part tabloid set from DC just to see what's going on. and I read some at the stands when I get a chance. So from what I understand, Hal Jordan and Barry Allen are back, and everything at Marvel and DC has been retroconned again and again.

To me, the most exciting days in comic book caped characters were the late 30s-early 40s (really before my time), when everything was new and bursting all over, and kids would grab new issues and exclaim "I can't wait to see what's going to happen to [fill in the blank] this month!" Also the early sixties were cool (my time) because Marvel was introducing a plethora of new, highly characterized heroes, and for a few years anyway, you never knew what would happen to them.

Nowadays, who care what happens to merchandising symbols who have to pretty much stay the same forever so the next Movie, or lunchbox, or Underoos package sales will not be affected.