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November 24, 2013


FFF Results Post #358 -- Comics Reading DNA

On Friday, CR readers were asked to name as specifically as possible

1) The First Comic Of Any Kind You Remember Reading
2) A Comic That Got You Back Into Reading A Certain Kind Of Comic After You'd Given Up On That Kind Of Comic
3) A Comic That Got You Reading A Different Type Of Comic Altogether
4) A Comic That Made You Want To Make Comics Even If You Never Made Them
5) A Comic That Represents A Kind Of Comic You Have Yet To Explore.

This how they responded.

*****

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Tom Spurgeon

1. The Flintstones #21
2. X-Men #125
3. Elfquest #9
4. New Hat
5. Insect Fear #1

*****

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Dave Knott

1. Spider-Man: Invasion of the Dragon Men (Power Records #24)
2. Thor #337
3. Cerebus #114
4. Asterix and the Goths
5. Young Romance #1

*****

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Buzz Dixon

1. Showcase #20 (first appearance of Rip Hunter, Time Master)
2. Incredible Hulk v2 #92 ("Planet Hulk")
3. Deadbone Erotica (original 1971 Bantam edition)
4. Larry Ivie's Monsters And Heroes #2 ("Altron-Boy" back-up feature)
5. Pim & Francie

*****

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Justin J. Major

1. Superman Vol 1 #282
2. Astro City #1
3. Raw, vol. 2, no. 3
4. Haw!
5. The Adventures of Tintin

*****

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Will Pfeifer

1. Amazing Spider-Man #122
2. DC Comics Presents #11
3. American Flagg #1
4. Issues of Cynicalman
5. Ganges

*****

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Joe Vince

1. Marvel Tales #82, which reprinted the first part of an Amazing Spider-Man issue with Kraven, Ka-Zar, Gwen Stacy, a giant space monster and a trip to the Savage Land.
2. Avengers #1 in 1998. I started reading Kurt Busiek and George Perez's relaunch of the title along with Iron Man and Grant Morrison's JLA. All three got me back into superhero comics, but that Avengers issue kicked it off.
3. Maus: A Survivor's Tale
4. Hepcats: Snowblind
5. Jim

*****

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Douglas Wolk

1. Green Lantern/Green Arrow #109
2. Uncle Scrooge #219
3. Asterix the Gladiator
4. Yummy Fur #2 (Vortex series)
5. Anamorphosis

*****

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Jamie Coville

1) Marvel Tales #116
2) Hot Stuff Sizzlers #54
3) Preacher #1
4) 1992 Action Comics #1 reprint
5) Ediciones Jose G. Cruz El Santo Year 1 Number 1

*****

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Josh Leto

1. Claw the Unconquered #5
2. TEOTFW (got me back into ordering comics by mail)
3. Cerebus #75
4. Ed Brubaker's Lowlife #1
5. Monster #2

*****

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Chris Arrant

1. The Transformers #20 (1986)
2. X-Men Annual #11 (1987)
3. Death: The High Cost of Living #2
4. Ganges #1
5. Prison Pit

*****

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Woody Compton

1. Marvel Treasury 1 (a reprint of Spider-Man Annual 1)
2. Batman the Dark Knight Returns 1
3. Akira 1
4. ZAP 4
5. Bacchus 1

*****

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Michael Dooley

1. Mad #21 (1955)
2. Elektra: Assassin #1 (1986)
3. Valentina (1968)
4. Ace Hole: Midget Detective (1974)
5. Red Colored Elegy (2008)

*****

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Tom Bondurant

1. The Flash #241
2. Tales of the Teen Titans #50
3. American Flagg! #1
4. Miracleman #1
5. Naruto

*****

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Sean Rogers

1. Amazing Spider-Man #244
2. Calvin and Hobbes: Yukon Ho!
3. Sandman #48
4. What It Is
5. Homestuck

*****

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Stergios Botzakis

1. The New Teen Titans (1980 series) #22
2. New X-Men #114
3. Yummy Fur #5
4. The Amazing Spider-Man #2 (a reprint)
5. The Drifting Classroom #1

*****

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Danny Ceballos

1. MAD Magazine April 1974
2. All-Star Superman #1
3. Kramers Ergot 4
4. Ernie Pook's Comeek (circa 1985)
5. Gold Pollen and other stories: Masters of Alternative Manga Vol. 1

*****

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Jeppe Mulich

1. Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (in Danish translation)
2. Katsuya Terada's The Monkey King, Vol. 1
3. The Sandman: World's End
4. Akira, Vol. 2 (in Danish translation)
5. Chinese Hero: Tales of the Blood Sword

*****

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Chris Duffy

1. Dennis the Menace and His Friends series, #23: Dennis the Menace and Ruff
2. Captain America #1 (2005)
3. Phoenix: Volume 1: Dawn by Osamu Tezuka
4. Weirdo #25
5. The Incal

*****

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Derek Van Gieson

1. X-Men #171 (Claremont/Simonson) Rogue Joins, everybody hates her.
2. New Mutants #37 (Claremont/Wilshire/Sienkiewicz) everybody dies, brilliant
3. Eightball #1 (Daniel Clowes) hilarious and disturbing, can't get enough
4. Love & Rockets (Los Bros Hernandez) Folk tales & punk
5. Stray Toasters (Bill Sienkiewicz) the high achievement of a restless need to better one's art. Not for everyone but, holy shit.

*****

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Jog

1. Mickey Mouse (Gladstone) #235
2. Heavy Metal Vol. 24 No. 3 (July 2000)
3. Twisted Sisters 2: Drawing the Line
4. Supermen! The First Wave of Comic Book Heroes 1936-1941
5. Homestuck

*****

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Douglas Mullins

1. Daredevil #227
2. Astonishing X-Men #1
3. Powr Mastrs Vol. 1
4. Jimbo in Paradise
5. Zap Comix #1

*****

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Peter Birkemoe

1. Marvel’s Greatest Comics #84 (reprinting FF #76)
2. Antares by Leo
3. Cerebus 86
4. Notes Mésopotamiennes by François Ayroles
5. The Heart of Juliet Jones by Stan Drake

*****

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Zainab Akhtar

1. Tintin: Cigars of the Pharaoh
2. Pluto by Naoki Urasawa
3. Kinky and Cosy by Nix
4. None. Ever.
5. Red Coloured Elegy by Seiichi Hayashi

*****

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Michael F. Russo

1. Action Comics #447 (May 1975)
2. Captain America #34 (March 2008)
3. Love and Rockets #27 (August 1988)
4. Copra #6 (April 2013)
5. The End of the Fucking World

Most are self-explanatory, but TEOTFW for me is about mini-comics and how they come out of nowhere and shoot right by you into the stratosphere. I may be a little old to stay on top of a scene that wide and dense, but it seems to me to be like the primordial soup where the future (or all things comics) can come from.

*****

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Matt Silvie

1. Batman #308
2. The Dark Knight Returns
3. Eightball #1
4. Batman #308
5. Cerebus #1

*****

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Patrick Dean

1. Tales to Astonish #8 (vol. 2, Sub-Mariner reprints, 1980). I was four and wanted it because The Thing was on the cover. My older brother had some comics, but this is the one I poured over a lot.
2. Madman #2 (Tundra). Early college and I avoided superhero comics. This one made me want to revisit the silver-age stuff and current throwbacks, at least.
3. Flaming Carrot Comics #16. I was in 6th grade and I bought it from a comic shop that carried very little non-DC and Marvel titles. I was intrigued by the 80's B&W independent glut, what was left of it, for good or bad. Flaming Carrot ruined regular newsstand comics for me. It was like a pile of chaos.
4. I'd always been someone who drew from an early age, but I began drawing more comics on notebook paper every chance I got after Flaming Carrot Comics #16. I still have that copy, dogeared and signed by Bob Burden on the cover.
5. Towards the end of college, Devlin Thompson of Bizarro Wuxtry gave me a copy of Chester Brown's "Ed the Happy Clown" (Vortex tpb). I was horrified and obsessed with it. It inspired me to try to create something as surreal and upsetting as this book. I never had the guts to do it. I'm still waiting for that comic.

*****

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Jones Jones

1. Some kind of Australian B&W reprint of various DC comics -- the Justice League fought Darkseid, there was a Green Arrow story, and a Joe Kubert Hawkman that freaked me out (the one with the Shadow Thief, maybe?)
2. New X-Men #114
3. The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics
4. Acme Novelty Library #1
5. Little Nemo: So Many Splendid Sundays (I've read the strips, but not these super-high-end reprints; see also the IDW Artist Editions)

*****

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Matt Emery

1. 2000AD Prog 9
2. Captain America #25
3. 32 Stories: The Complete Optic Nerve Mini Comics
4. Anal Atrocities #1
5. The wonderful Mexican comics mentioned in The Imp #4

*****

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Michael May

1. Beep Beep The Road Runner #44
2. Alpha Flight #1 (1983)
3. Hellboy: Seed of Destruction #1
4. 30 Days of Night #1
5. Love and Rockets #1

*****

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Mike Palumbo

1. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #6 -- I was 5 years old and heading towards TMNT obsession like most boys my age. I'm not ashamed to say this was my first comic.
2. New X-Men #114 -- I had been away from superhero books for most of my teenage years. I tried getting back into them with some of the Marvel Knights minis, but this is this is the book that "officially" made superheroes cool again (for me, anyway).
3. Fist of the North Star (vol. 1) #5 -- I found the last four issues of this run in a quarter bin at a flea market when I was 13 or so. The cover art was so different from anything I'd seen to that point -- this was my "gateway" to manga.
4. Captain Britain by Alan Moore & Alan Davis -- I somehow ended up with a few issues of the "X-Men Archives" reprints, and liked them enough to track down the trade. I read it in bits and pieces during bus rides between campuses during my freshman year of college. There was something magical about it that made me say THIS is what I want to do (which may or may not have contributed to my spotty attendance and declining grades). Over a decade later, on those occasions when my confidence in my work wanes, I still look back to this to remember why I wanted to make comics in the first place.
5. Crossed #1 -- I'm not sure that I have the stomach for the type of book that spawned a series of "torture" variants. Maybe 50 years from now, when something even more disgusting comes along and we look back at these books the same way people look at the EC books today.

*****

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Oliver Ristau

1. Kelter Comic Nr. 8 Kitty Kids
2. Paradis Perdu by Ange, Varanda, Alberto & Lyse
3. Goth by Kendi Oiwa & Otsuichi
4. Superman/Batman 10/1977 ("Intruder From A Dead World" by Haney, Elias & Calnan)
5. Warren Craghead III I hate drawing

*****

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Jeffrey O. Gustafson

1. Tintin in Tibet
2. Amazing Spider-Man Volume 2 #30
3. Pluto volume 1
4. American Splendor (the movie, actually)
5. Crime SuspenStories 22

*****
*****
 
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