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March 25, 2012


FFF Results Post #288 -- Show And Year

On Friday, CR readers were asked to "Name Four Specific Comics Conventions Or Festivals You Enjoyed And Give A Few Reasons You Enjoyed The One You Have At #4 As The Fifth Response." This is how they responded.

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Tom Spurgeon

1. San Diego Comic-Con (1995)
2. An Unnamed, I Don't Think Repeated Show In Chicago (1992)
3. Heroes Con (2008)
4. BCGF (2011)
5. The BCGF I attended late last year was my first time out of the house since my summer health issues. I was exhausted most of the day, but it was good to be back on my feet, seeing people I knew, and meeting people I didn't. I even got to moderate a panel. I'm not the biggest con-goer, but I really, really appreciated this one.

*****

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Scott Dunbier

1) Lucca 1990
2) San Diego Comic-Con 2000
3) United Kingdom Comic Art Convention (UKCAC) 1987
4) Detroit 1990 (approximately) Great Eastern conventions?
5) Okay, I was torn, I was going to write about the first time I went to Lucca and how beautiful the city was, the wonderful people, and the food... hmm. But I had to go with this one in Detroit because -- even though it was a lousy show (I did it as an art dealer and had zero sales on the first day, a couple hundred bucks on the second) -- I don't think I ever laughed so much in my entire life as I did sitting in a hotel room with Mike Mignola and Mark Nelson, just the three of us telling stories and watching a Ronco commercial with Mr. Ronco himself spray painting his head. Might be the funniest night I've ever spent. Oh, one more thing -- the show was at a Hyatt that had its elevators arranged in a circle, with the buttons in the center on this platform that looked like the crystals in Superman's Fortress from the movie. It was a bit confusing, took you a second to realize where the buttons were. So this woman walks up and can't figure out where the buttons are. She looks around for a minute and then figures it out in her head -- and she walks over and starts jumping up and smacking the indicator lights next to one of the elevators. Ah, good times.

*****

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Kat Kan

1. NoviCon just outside Detroit (2003)
2. Wrath of Con in Panama City Beach, FL (2009)
3. Creative Con in Panama City, FL (2011)
4. New York Comic Con (2007)
5. NYCC is the only major comic con I've been able to attend; I was a panelist for the Trade Day before the official opening of the convention, and I was able to walk the floor of the con and meet some great comics people before I had to fly back home.

*****

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Will Pfeifer

1. Chicago Con (1986)
2. Mid Ohio Con (2003)
3. Motor City Con (1995, I think)
4. C2E2 (2010)
5. Chicago Con (1992) Coming back to the hotel at around 2 in the morning and seeing the lines of people still waiting for autographs from the guys in the Image tent is something I'll never forget seeing. A strange time in comics!

*****

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Tom Mason

(1) New York Comic Art Convention (1978)
(2) WonderCon (1994)
(3) Comic Con International (2010)
(4) Grenoble (1990)
(5) One night by invitation, I was part of a very small dinner group of six people that included Ervin Rustemagic and Hermann (creator of Jeremiah). While waiting in the hotel lobby for our last person to show up, Maurice De Bevere (aka Morris, the creator of Lucky Luke) dropped by for a few minutes and regaled us with stories.

*****

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Jamie Coville

1. Paradise Toronto Comic Con 2005
2. TCAF 2010
3. Hobby Star Fan Expo 2006
4. San Diego Comic Con 2008
5. This was my first San Diego. I got to meet in person a number of pros and friends I've communicated with online for many years. The programing blew away all other conventions I've been to. I also saw/bought a bunch of books I didn't see available elsewhere. Even after long, red eye flight home with a stop over I was so happy for having been there I was full of energy and rocking out during my 2 1/2 hour drive home from the Syracuse airport.

*****

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Michael Dooley

1. New York EC Comics Convention (1972)
2. San Diego Comic-Con (1974)
3. Los Angeles Comic Book and Science Fiction Convention (1986)
4. San Diego Comic-Con International (2006)
5. Busy, busy. Moderating four sessions – "Masters of American Comics," "Masters of Lowbrow Art," "Masters of Alternative Comics," and "Comics: When Pictures and Words Collide" -- with a spectrum of star panelists: Ivan Brunetti, Mary Fleener, Rick Geary, R.C. Harvey, Chip Kidd, Denis Kitchen, Roger Langridge, Isabel Samaras, Shag, Brian Walker, Esther Pearl Watson, Craig Yoe, and others... and what's not to love about that? Also, autographing and otherwise hyping my first, newly published book, The Education of a Comics Artist. Only downside: for the full four days I didn't get to just roam around and discover/experience things that didn't involve me, me.

*****

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Mark McMurray

* San Diego Comic-Con (August 1998)
* SPX, Silver Spring, Maryland (Sept 1997)
* ACE, Manchester, Vermont (July 1995)
* Creation Con, NYC (November 1978)
* I was 10 and couldn't have imagined something as amazing as a "Creation Con" would exist in our world! Watching John Byrne sketch for fans between autographing comics and trading barbs with Howie Chaykin, who sat next to him, was an enlightening experience for this young fan. I still own the Cyclops sketch he did for me that day! The quest to own a complete collection of X-men started at this show after snagging a copy of X-Men #8 in great shape for 8 bucks! By shows end, my autograph book was filled with signatures from many artists like Steranko, Herb Trimpe, Gray Morrow, Bob Larkin, JR AND JR JR, Gene Colan, Rudy Nebres, Tom Yeates, etc etc etc! I could go on and on, but all in all, it was a great day that has stayed with me all these years.

*****

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Rodrigo Baeza

1. Fantabaires (Buenos Aires, Argentina) (1998)
2. SPX (1999)
3. SPX (2000)
4. All Time Classic New York Comic Book Convention (White Plains, NY) (2000)
5. This was a one-time event focused on Silver Age comics, with guests that included creators such as Carmine Infantino, Joe Kubert, Marie Severin, Roy Thomas, and Julius Schwartz. It was great to see these people in person and in some very interesting convention panels (some of which were later transcribed and published in the pages of Alter Ego). This con was also an opportunity to meet people (such as the late Rich Morrisey) from some of the comics-related mailing lists I participated at the time, always a fun thing. All in all, it was a great experience, and many of the people who have attended agree that this was a unique convention. My only disappointment was not being able to meet Henry Boltinoff (he was a guest, but due to health reasons it seems he didn't spend too much time at the con).

*****

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Greg Vondruska

1) Small Press Expo (2002)
2) Unnamed Tampa convention (1986)
3) A.P.E. (1997)
4) Megacon (1995)
5) Megacon (1995) I got a signature from Gil Kane, got a critique from Dick Giordano and listened to Howard Chaykin in a panel as he described how America hates virtuosity.

*****

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Scott Edelman

1. Creation (1971)
2. San Diego Comic-Con International (2007)
3. SPX (2009)
4. Phil Seuling's July 4th Comic Art Convention (1970)
5. I was 15, it was my first convention, and I watched as a copy of Action Comics #1 failed to meet its $325 minimum bid at auction. Then I found I was sitting next to Big Name Fan Tom Fagan in the audience, to whom the copy was brought to flip through as I stared wide-eyed. Oh, and I bought my first Golden Age comic and my first page of original art. Could it get any better?

*****

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Shannon Smith

1. Fluke 2011
2. SPX 2011
3. HeroesCon 2003
4. Atlanta Comicon 2001
5. This was the 1st Atlanta Comicon way out in Gwinnett County. Not to be confused with several other similar named shows. A pal of mine was a co-founder so I was suckered into being a volunteer. I wanted to be a comic book writer so I took advantage of the situation and spent a lot of time talking with writers. Todd Dezago put the notion in my head to not wait on an artist and just go ahead and make minicomics on my own. The next con season I was on the other side of the table with my first minicomics.

*****

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Chris Arrant

1. MegaCon 2003
2. MegaCon 2007
3. DragonCon 2010
4. Comic-Con International: San Diego (2005)
5. First Comic-Con ever, and Dean Haspiel took 10 minutes out of his day to give me a whirlwind floor tour and introductions with some great cartoonists.

*****

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Marc Arsenault

1. FantaCon (1982)
2. San Diego Comic-Con (1989)
3. SPX (1997)
4. APE (1994)
5. The first APE. Wow Cool's first west coast show as an exhibitor. Zak Sally drove us down and exhibited with us. First big alternative press comic show I can think of every having heard of outside of anarchist book fairs. I don't remember if it was at the first or second APE (maybe both) but we were set up next to Vale from ReSearch. He bought a copy of the Sassy with Kurt & Courtney on the cover from me at a later show.

*****

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Buzz Dixon

1. Noreascon 1 (1971)
2. Christian Book Sellers Association (or whatever they're calling it now) (2007)
3. SDCC (1986)
4. Rockin' Pasadena Comic Con (2010)
5. Rockin' Pasadena Comic Con was a disaster of truly epic proportions: A huge venue, lots of vendors, plenty of programming but absolutely no attendees! Stan Lee showed up for an autograph session & bailed as soon as possible. I don't think there was a single panel that didn't have more panelists than audience members (and those were usually vendors). Even the Scientologists closed their booth & bailed a day early! Why am I listing it as a con I enjoyed? 'Cuz I got to hang out & talk w/o interruption with a number of friends, I picked up a rare DVD, and I get bragging rights for being at one of the worse shows in history!

*****

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Steven Thompson

1 -- The 1977 Comic Art Convention (Normally held in New York but in Philadelphia that year)
2 -- Don Rosa's Omnicon in Louisville in 1976
3 -- A 1975 Cleveland Con in August
4 -- Chicago Con in 1989 or 90
5 -- It was the first Con attended with my future wife, we made friends with Kim Yale and Kate Worley, both of whom died too soon.

*****

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Evan Dorkin

1. SPX (1994)
2. MOCCA (2002)
3. TCAF (2007)
4. San Diego Comic-Con (2000)
5. This was the last year I attended SDCC after going almost every year since 1987 (we stopped going mainly due to the cost), and it was a weird show for me knowing that. I was also nominated for two Eisner awards for Dork #7, a work I was fairly proud of and thought actually deserving of the nominations for a change. I didn't win, which bummed me out a bit. After the ceremony I decided to introduce myself to Will Elder, one of my favorite cartoonists and someone who's work has been a big influence on me. I'm usually too nervous to introduce myself to people but I had had a few drinks and I knew I'd never have another opportunity to meet him, so I went over. Anyway, to cut to the quick, I had a fifteen-minute talk with Elder and his wife and it was one of the most wonderful convention memories I have and will likely ever have.

*****

yeah, I lost a couple of these; my apologies

*****

this feature will return in two weeks

*****
*****
 
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