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January 20, 2014


FFF Results Post #363 -- Help Along The Way

On Friday, CR readers were asked to "List Five People In Comics, Whether You've Met Them Or Not, Who Helped You In Your Career Or Your Understanding Of The Art Form. Give The Year Of Your Encounter. For The Last One, Briefly Describe The Context." This is how they responded.

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ERIC REYNOLDS

1. Gary Groth (1993)
2. Peter Bagge (1993)
3. Daniel Clowes (1994)
4. Robert Williams (1996)
5. Kim Thompson (1996) -- The person I spent more time around over the last 20 years than anyone but my wife. I'm still learning things from him, even though he's not here.

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Julia Wertz

1. Peter Bagge (2004)
2. Benn & Rachel (2006)
3. Laura Park (2007)
4. Annie Koyama (2012)
5. Julie Doucet (2003 and 2013) first inspiring me in 2003 through her work, which was a major lynchpin in my foray into comics, and then in 2013 for telling me that it’s okay to quit comics and do whatever the hell I want.

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STEVE LIEBER

1. Harvey Kurtzman: (In print) 1978
2. Joe Kubert: In print-1974. In person-1987
3. Jaime Hernandez: (In print) 1983
4. Jeff Parker 1993
5. Bob Schreck 1991 I met Bob at a convention and showed him some work. He went on to hire me for three separate projects, all of which had a huge impact on my career.

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JEFFREY O. GUSTAFSON

1. J. Michael Straczynski. (I've been following Straczynski's works since 1993 and his once-voluminous online presence since at least 1996, informative, entertaining, enlightening.)
2. Heidi MacDonald (as long as The Beat's been online/when she gave me the opportunity to write for her last year)
3. Jonathan Hickman (2009)
4. Dan Slott (Every conversation I've had with the man, 2008,'09,'10,'11,'12,'13)
5. JHU Comics Books co-owner/manager Nick Purpura. I have learned more about comics, retail (and Life) from this man than any other person. (2007)

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JAMES VANCE

1. Denis Kitchen (1987)
2. Dave Schreiner (1987)
3. Harvey Kurtzman (1986)
4. Archie Goodwin (1995)
5. John Wooley (1984), who told me that instead of adapting my "Kings in Disguise" as a backup for his Fantagraphics series "The Miracle Squad," I should pitch it as a book on its own.

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TIM O'NEIL

1. Abhay Kholsa (2002)
2. Neilalien (2004)
3. Mike Sterling (2004)
4. Tucker Stone (2008)
5. Milo George (2001) -- My first review for the Journal had actually been rejected by outgoing editor Anne Elizabeth Moore. When Milo got the job his first issue didn't have a scheduled feature, so it ended up being an odds-and-sods backlog of reviews and apparently even stuff off the slush pile -- such as my review of Wendel All Together. I've been coasting on the Journal's reputation for thirteen years now, even if I haven't written anything officially for the magazine since, I believe, 2008.

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MATTHEW CRAIG

1. Simon Furman, 1986
2. art spiegelman, 1991
3. Scott McCloud, 1993
4. Warren Bloody Ellis, 1995-2007
5. Shane Chebsey. For more than a decade, Shane has been responsible for taking small press and indy comics to the masses, through his Smallzone publishing house/distribution service and organisation of conventions in the English Midlands. My first shows (and most of my best) were organised by Shane and his colleagues, and I look forward to their resumption this Autumn.

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DANNY CEBALLOS

* Don Martin (1975)
* Ian Pollock (1984)
* Jim Woodring (1990)
* Gabrielle Bell (2009)
* Lynda Barry's WRITING THE UNTHINKABLE class profoundly changed my writing and thinking about comics and life. (2003)

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JANICE HEADLEY

* lynda barry (1994) -- my gateway artist into underground comix
* mike baehr (1996) -- for a million reasons, natch! and for taking me to million year picnic in cambridge the first night we met
* gary groth & kim thompson (2007) -- for inviting me into the fantagraphics family, and for believing in me
* peggy burns (2007) -- for inspiring me to do things better (WWPBD)
* eroyn franklin & kelly froh (2013) -- for inviting me to be a part of short run, which has been one of the most rewarding projects i've ever worked on

*****

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SARAH HORROCKS

1. Brandon Graham (2013)
2. Sloane Leong (2012)
3. Alison Sampson (2012)
4. Robin McConnell (2009)
5. David Lafuente (2008) -- Met him when I was still just making collage comics, and he had feedback every week on what I was doing with them, and just in general gave me someone to talk about the art of making comics, at a time when I could have just as easily been making comics in a complete vacuum, he gave me both an audience, and someone I could learn from, without him my art wouldn't have progressed nearly as quickly.

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MARC-OLIVER FRISCH

1. Eric J. Moreels (2003)
2. Heidi MacDonald (2004)
3. Frauke Pfeiffer (2005)
4. Klaus Schikowski (2012)
5. Alan Heathcock, who as far as I can tell has nothing to do with comics except having one of his short stories illustrated by Marjane Satrapi but is the best teacher I ever had, told me, when we parted ways, to "Go out there and do some damage." I still hope I didn't misunderstand him.

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DAVE KELLY

* Chester Gould (1986)
* Bob Kane (1986)
* Vernon Wiley, owner of my hometown store The Comix Gallery (2002)
* Michel Fiffe (2011)
* Julia Wertz (2008) -- A former co-worker of mine who couldn't understand why the hell I bought her book (Fart Party I). I liked it so much, it made me want to publish comics of my own.

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James Moore

1. Warren Ellis (2000ish)
2. Robert Loss (2012)
3. Katie Valeska/Ken Eppstein/Christian Hoffer (2011)
4. Lucy Caswell (2013)
5. Joel Jackson (2009) -- for saying "Do you want to make a comic book together?" and then our doing so. I've got to know so many fantastic people, and had so many experiences that all spiral from that moment.

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DERIK A. BADMAN

1. Dave Sim (1991)
2. Frank Santoro (2005)
3. Andrei Molotiu (2008)
4. The guy who ran my local small town comic store which carried everything (1989)
5. Some random person at a comic con in NJ (~1989) who handed me a free copy of Appleseed v.1 no. 2 and thus introduced me to real manga.

*****

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SCOTT DUNBIER

* Ernie Colon (1983)
* Carol Kalish (1984)
* Darwyn Cooke (2007)
* Gene Ha (2007)
* Sarah Becker very kindly showed me how to edit my first comic book when I was too self-conscious and proud to ask for help (1995)

*****

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CHRIS DUFFY

1. Carol Kalish (1989)
2. Howard Cruse (1991)
3. Peter Kuper (1992)
4. Mark Newgarden (1993)
5. Len Wein told me to get my ass to New York City if I wanted a job in comics. (1990).

*****

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PEGGY BURNS

1. Diane Noomin (1993)
2. Daniel Clowes (1997)
3. Jeff Ayers (1999)
4. Joe Sacco: (2000)
5. Tom Devlin: (2001) The love of my life, father of my children, my coworker and best friend: but also the crazy-ass genius of Highwater Books willing to risk everything and his own well-being so people could read the comics of cartoonists who otherwise may not be published. Every morning when we leave for work, he says "Let's Go Save Comics" -- at once driving me insane, making me laugh and happy to go to work.

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JUSTIN J. MAJOR

1. Chris Ware (2005)
2. Ivan Brunetti (2005)
3. Seth (1992)
4. Chris Onstad (2002)
5. Lynda Barry drawing a cartoon for me on a sweetener packet was my first non-commercial contact with a comics artist. (1997).

*****

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TOM DEVLIN

1. Don Martin (1976) The most powerful image maker of that era of MAD. His cartoons from that era are still seared in my brain.
2. Gilbert Hernandez (1984) I had lost interest in comics mostly but the Palomar stories brought me back in hard. I believe he changed everything in modern comics more than any other person.
3. Jessica Abel (1994) I was working at the Million Year Picnic and bringing cartoonists to the store for signings. Not only did Jessica have tons of great advice when I started Highwater, she said to me the famous words, "you should call this kid in Providence, Brian Ralph."
4. Ron Regé Jr (1994) Ron was the first devoted underground comics reader I ever met and the first person I could talk about the possibilities of comics stories with.
5. Peggy Burns (2001) The most important person in comics and my love and every morning she says "ugh" when I say "Let's Go Save Comics."

*****

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ADRIAN KINNAIRD

1. Grant Morrison (1998)
2. Eddie Campbell (2000)
3. David Mack (2002)
4. Mike Allred (2010)
5. Dylan Horrocks (2006) Recommended me to an editor, which led to my first graphic novel pitch - and learning the ropes. Thanks, D!

*****

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SEAN KLEEFELD

1. Paul Jenkins (1999)
2. John Morrow (2003)
3. Tom Brevoort (2009)
4. David Gallaher (2011)
5. Peter Sanderson's work helped serve as an early model for both my research and my writing. (1985)

*****

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JEFF PARKER

* Al Williamson (1989)
* Bo Hampton (1992)
* Steve Lieber (1993-now)
* Hank Kanalz (1994-now)
* Mark Paniccia -- If you've enjoyed anything I wrote in ten years of writing Marvel comics, then please thank Mark Paniccia who has always wanted to hear how I would handle a project.

*****

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STEVE MURPHY

1. Gary Groth and Kim Thompson (1977 onwards)
2. Bryan Talbot (1982)
3. Dave Sim (1985)
4. Eastman and Laird (1988)
5. Michael Zulli, for walking into my comics shop and setting both our wheels in motion (1984).

*****

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MATT EMERY

1. Geoff Harrison (1985)
2. Tim Bollinger (Late '90's)
3. Tom Spurgeon (2005)
4. Baden Kirgan (2008)
5. Brendan Halyday taught me all about the production side of making and printing comics and has been a continual great source of advice. (2007)

*****

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JOE DECIE

* Joann Sfar (2012)
* Kenny Penman (2010)
* James Kochalka (2008)
* Delaine Derry Green (1996)
* Roger Radio, my stepdad, showed me even my stepdad could draw crap jokes -- he used to draw strips and cartoons for VIZ (1986)

*****

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CHRIS ARRANT

1. Mike Heisler (1995)
2. Matt Brady (2005)
3. Dean Haspiel (2006)
4. Dan Warner (2006)
5. Ross Campbell and I hung out at the bar outside SDCC when he was just an up-and-comer and humanized to me the struggle of people working in comics, and gave me a new perspective. (2006)

*****

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WILL PFEIFER

* Matt Feazell (1986)
* P. Craig Russell (1986)
* Jill Thompson (1988)
* Joan Hilty (1998)
* Jay Geldhof let me hang out in his studio and make my mini-comics (1986)

*****

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DAN MORRIS

1. Dustin Harbin (1999)
2. Stephen Bissette (2000)
3. Chester Brown (2003)
4. Frank Santoro (2006)
5. Brian Ralph telling me that I needed to figure out a direction for my work (2009)

*****

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MELISSA MENDES

1. Bill Watterson (1992)
2. Jason Lutes (2001)
3. Brian Ralph (2004)
4. James Sturm (2005)
5. Ana Merino said one of my short stories had all images and no action. (2009)

*****

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BUZZ DIXON

1. Gerry Boudreau (1978)
2. Mark Evanier (1979)
3. Jack Kirby (1980)
4. Stan Lee (1985)
5. Steve Gerber was a fellow staff writer at Ruby-Spears; he asked me to script a fight scene for Destroyer Duck #5 that ended up being drawn by Jack Kirby -- HOW'S THAT FOR A FIRST GIG IN COMICS!!! (1979)

*****

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CHARLES FORSMAN

1. Alec Longstreth (2006)
2. James Sturm (2008)
3. Lynda Barry (2007)
4. Tom Devlin (2007)
5. Sammy Harkham told me to stop drawing pointy elbows on my characters. (2012)

*****

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CHARLES BROWNSTEIN

* Jim Valentino (1992)
* Rory Root (1994)
* Denis Kitchen (1995)
* Rick Veitch (1995)
* Larry Marder (1993) -- answered all my questions for the interview magazine I published, and eventually invited me to run his Beanworld booth from 1995 to 1998, which was my graduate education in the comics business. He didn't teach me everything I know, but he taught me how to think about all the knowledge I acquire.

*****

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ALAN DOANE

1. Cat Yronwode (1979)
2. Barry Windsor-Smith (1999)
3. James Kochalka (2000)
4. Tony Isabella (2003)
5. Milo George asked me to write an article for The Comics Journal (2004).

I doubt Cat Yronwode remembers talking to me on the phone for an hour in 1979, but I'll never forget it!

*****

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JE COLE

1. Goseki Kojima (2000)
2. Sean Phillips (2010)
3. Juan Gimenez (1999)
4. Brandon Graham (2013)
5. Sean Azzopardi (2014) "Good luck Joseph. Maybe next year just put something out. You'll learn much, much, more than any book can offer up. Lose that fear, invite criticism. There is a lot of work to be made, don't leave it too late!"

*****

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RYAN SANDS

1. Jose Garibaldi (1994)
2. Eric Nakamura (2007)
3. Colin Turner (2007)
4. Fred Schodt (2008)
5. Michael DeForge brought me along with him to a basement punk show during TCAF weekend, and we shared a fifth of Jameson. (2009).

*****

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DOUGLAS WOLK

1. Dafna Pleban (2009)
2. Chris Ryall (2012)
3. Randy Scott (1982)
4. Heidi MacDonald (2000)
5. Dan Mishkin gave me my first credit in a comic book. (1983)

*****

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DUSTIN HARBIN

1. Shelton Drum (1993)
2. Matt Fraction (1996)
3. Paul Pope (1997)
4. Chris Pitzer (2005)
5. Annie Koyama (2009)

Annie is inspirational in a way that not many people will ever be. I feel lucky to know her and to have her friendship, and I feel even more fortunate that we have a person with her energy and selflessness working in our selfish little industry.

*****

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RYAN KELLY

1. Peter Krause (1990)
2. Peter Gross (1997)
3. Brian Wood (2005)
4. Becky Cloonan (2006)
5. Wally Wood -- I never met him, I just find his work and life interesting. Plus, he's from Minnesota.

*****

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DAVID BAILLIE

1. Simon Furman (1988)
2. Scott McCloud (1999)
3. Stan Sakai (2003)
4. Matt Smith / Tharg (2006)
5. Mike Carey -- the first professional writer to give me encouragement -- he also passed on the advice given to him by Karen Berger: that there's no such thing as a big break, just a series of small ones. (2007)

*****

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JAMIE S. RICH

1. Jann Robinson (2007)
2. Steven T. Seagle (2004)
3. Scott Morse (1999)
4. Michael Allred (1994)
5. Jo Duffy, gave me my first script review, even though I did it all wrong, at a Creation Con in Los Angeles. (1986).

*****

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TOM SPURGEON

1. Dan Wright (1979)
2. Kim Thompson (1994)
3. Gary Groth (1994)
4. Caitlin McGurk (2011)
5. Wiley W. Spurgeon, Jr. (1981) -- both of my parents were generally positive about my interest in comics but Dad actually clipped Barnaby for a while, and that was an act so light years ahead of my own interest in comics that it really blew me away. He counts because, as he constantly reminded me when I worked at The Comics Journal, he had one of the most important jobs in my industry: buying strips for the newspaper he ran.

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topic suggested and list provided by Chris Duffy

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